C-level

Lean In Applied: The Secret for Your Success

While I wholeheartedly recommend that you read the whole of Sheryl Sandberg's wonderful book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, there's one secret that will ensure your success from your start to wherever you want to go.

It's adopting what I've come to call The Zuckerberg Question as a mantra. That question is:

What would you do if you weren't afraid?

This question, consistently posed by Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, is plastered and painted on the walls of Facebook and Ms. Sandberg correctly plasters it right up front in her book, using it as the subtitle to her first chapter.

Only it's not a subtitle. It's not a sub anything.

It's everything.

Because one of the most important things I learned as I worked with C-level executives and Board members is that - men and women, both - they make far too many of their decisions based on fear. Oh, they wouldn't admit it and they always had excuses - but, far too frequently, the decisions they made came from that one devastating emotion:

Fear.

As a result, those supposedly brave executives and Board members on whom employees, shareholders, customers, suppliers and local communities were relying didn't do the things they knew were right. Because they were afraid.

What or who were they afraid of? It varied - but there was always some outside entity that drove them in a direction they knew wasn't best but was workable. Sort of.

That led me, over the years. to consistently remind my clients - whether applied to a specific person, a competitor or the unknown 'other':

They don't matter.

Because they don't.

What does matter is that you do what you know is right - recognizing but not becoming a victim of your fear - moving ahead in achieving your goals for yourself and, if they're smart, your organization.

To solve that potential dilemma and get away from the fear requires putting it together with one of Ms. Sandberg's other early stage crucial points about what holds so many women back:

Likability and Success.

What it comes down to is that, for men, there's a positive correlation between success and being liked - whereas, for women it's exactly the opposite.

Yup. If you're a woman and you're successful, chances are people aren't going to either actually like you or think that you're as likable as you would be if you were successful and were a man.

Why do you think that Time magazine put the headline "Don't Hate Me Because I'm Successful" over their cover photograph of Ms. Sandberg? They weren't kidding - as the research Ms. Sandberg's cites in her book clearly demonstrates and as she, herself, has experienced since going live with her book and Foundation.

(For those of you old enough to remember - or want to find it on YouTube - it's all reminiscent of the supposedly tongue-in-cheek, but very intentional Kelly LeBrock Pantene commercial, "Don't Hate Me Because I'm Beautiful.")

So let's take a look at this for a moment.

When you're dealing with success, you'll find that there are generally three kinds of people in an organization:
  • The Glommers (people who ride your success),
  • The Underminers (people who do everything they can to take away your success), and
  • The Supporters (people who believe in what you're doing and support it with their own actions).
Frankly, you're not going to avoid any of them so the trick is to plan for them even before you've achieved your success. Then remind yourself of that plan every day as you see them pop up.

So, let's play for a moment. Let's say an opportunity arises and you want to move on it - or at least you think you do. Here's what you do in five easy steps:
  1. Ask yourself: What would I do if I weren't afraid?
  2. Using that answer as a foundation, put together a plan or a means of demonstrating why you're the right person or you've got the right solution.
  3. Don't wait for permission to execute. Do it. Act on it. Find all the ways you can to move forward what you're offering or have to offer, positioned in such a way that others simultaneously see the value of your solution and how valuable you are because you're the one who came up with it and knows how to execute on it successfully. That's because you're already doing so - whether in stealth mode (so that no one can steal your solution or your success) or outwardly (if there's low risk of theft of your Intellectual Property...because that's what your solution is).
  4. Remind yourself that you're not afraid - and if you find yourself falling back into fear, ask The Zuckerberg Question again: What would I do if I weren't afraid? then move forward with your fears back in check.
  5. Watch those around you. Look for who is falling into each of the categories - Glommers, Underminers and Supporters - and act accordingly. Specifically: 
  • Build with the Supporters. Get them more involved. Learn from them. Incorporate their ideas. Make your idea or solution even bigger than it was. Remember - you're not afraid and that means that there are no limits on your thinking.
  • Study the Underminers. Figure out their strategy and the arguments they're using (or trying to use) to undermine what you're trying to do. Then reverse engineer them so that you preemptively build on what they're trying to do and undermine them before they can undermine you. Other than that, ignore them. They don't matter.
  • Keep an eye on the Glommers. For the most part, they don't matter either - but, depending upon how they use what you're doing to fulfill their own agenda, you want to be aware of any personal or professional undermining that they may create. 
And, throughout, don't sweat being liked. Clearly, based on the categories, some folks will and some folks won't.

For the ones that do like you and show it by supporting what you're doing, good for them. They're the smart kids and you want them in your cadre.

For the ones who don't, they don't matter. Seriously. They don't.

There are over six billion people in the world. Some of them are at work with you. Most of them aren't. Keep that six billion number in mind when you lean in - because for the ones who are waiting to lean in and simply need a catalyst, that's you.

Because you're not afraid.
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More on Leaning In:
   Sheryl Sandberg and Lean In: Why the Time is Now (llk)
   Preparing to Win: When you Lean In...there be monsters (llk)
Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead (sandberg)
The Lean In Foundation

Secrets of Success: You're Not Alone

Today, as I was reading the truly excellent OpEd piece on the Business of Fashion site, I was reminded of what always struck me as the stupidest series of questions I almost invariably got when I was a C-level advisor talking with a new client. Here are the two versions of how it went:

Version 1:
Executive: Have you worked in our industry before?
Me: No.
Executive: Well, we're different.
Version 2:
Executive: Have you worked in our industry before?
Me: Yes.
Executive: Well, we're different.
Do you see a pattern here?

The thing that continued to amaze me - and does until this day - is the provincialism and insularity of each industry or company. Everyone thinks that what they're experiencing is different from what everyone else is experiencing.

They're wrong. And if you think that way, you're wrong, too.

Sure, there are nuances that are industry or company-specific. In fact, they're function-specific, if you want to get down to that level of detail - which, eventually, you do.

But to think that you're living in some sort of vacuum and can't learn from other industries about how to get over and beyond humps and hurdles is not only short-sighted, it's dangerous.

Granted, each industry goes through its own version of a set of problems that the industry has to solve for itself. Those within the industry that learn and grow fastest and best are the winners. The laggards either stay that way, have to work WAY harder than before to catch up or go out of business whether through M&A (if they're lucky) or closure.

What's always worth watching is how each industry is addressing, embracing and integrating the challenges it faces. That arc is your lesson.

That's why the Business of Fashion OpEd was so important. It talks about how the "businessmen" in both fashion and media have taken innovation out of fashion. How, by corporate ownership industrializing design to the point of sameness (for which read blandness), real creativity is either threatened, gone or only coming from the really courageous designers or those outside the mainstream industry.

Innovation is everyone's job in every industry and sector. From small, almost unnoticeable tweaks in how you do business to new product or service launches that change the world (or at least your industry), innovation is key to success.

So why wouldn't you read a piece focusing on the threats to innovation written about the luxe industry and fashion, in particular?

If you're smart, you would. In fact, if you intend to succeed, you will.

Don't be insular. Don't think you're different - at least not at first.

Start by knowing that others - before you and currently, in your industry and out - have and are facing the challenges that you face. Then be open to learning from them.

If you do, eventually they'll be learning from you.
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Who Watches the Watchmen? (Business of Fashion)