Performance Appraisal: "I neither agree nor accept."

It's performance appraisal season!

How do I know? Because, lately I've been getting calls from friends, colleagues and even former clients who are either getting ready for or are in the midst of their annual performance evaluations.

The one constant - no matter their level in the organization or the specific industry, sector or country they work in - is that no one is happy with the process.

They have every right and reason for that feeling.

In the vast majority of cases, there's no reason to be happy with performance evaluation systems. That's because they rarely do what they're supposed to do: Develop.
Develop the employee.
Develop the culture.
Develop the organization.
Develop profits and revenues for the organization and success and a sense of accomplishment for the employee.
Instead, they're more often used as a punishment tool or a box-ticking exercise by management. That not only defeats the purpose, but also adds exponential costs and lost opportunities to the organization.

I'll get into how all of that plays out in later posts, but, let's be specific for the moment.

What should you do as you're getting ready for your evaluation?

When I'm asked for my advice, the first thing I  say is:
You don't have to accept the evaluation you're given - not psychologically, emotionally nor in writing. The only time you accept is when you see merit in it and can agree with what's been written as being wholly representative of your performance.
In fact, just in case, I teach everyone the same sentence:
"I neither agree nor accept."
And I make them repeat it to me - many, many times - as our preparatory discussion ensues.

Why that sentence? Because it's liberating. It means that you're not just sitting there as a target for whatever impressions, thoughts, ideas or agendas may be thrown your way.

Too often, employees feel powerless in the evaluation process. It doesn't matter whether you're being asked to evaluate yourself or you're reading your manager's evaluation. It doesn't matter whether you're a front-line employee or have an office in the executive suite.

You sit. You listen. You feel violated.

Not if you neither agree nor accept. Better yet, not if you tell them so.

The thing is - to be able to make your case, you need to be prepared. You need to:
  • Get a copy of the blank evaluation form prior to your appraisal and become familiar with its criteria
  • Get a copy of your job description and review it before you fill out the appraisal form or have your appraisal interview
  • Put together a portfolio of your accomplishments for the appraisal period - with as many soft and hard numbers as you can include - that address the appraisal criteria and demonstrate how you've fulfilled and exceeded the criteria and your job description's responsibilities.
By doing so, if you disagree with your management's assessment, you have specifics and associated documentation to support your comments. You're not just spouting off. You're making a reasoned and reasonable case for your management to re-think their evaluation of you.

Because you deserve it.
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Please note that nothing expressed above constitutes legal advice.