Brand messaging and customer loyalty: why @Staples should fire Its Marketing department

I'm a long-time customer of the office supply store, Staples...or I was. Because I'm not any longer - and it's their Marketing Department's fault. There are two very specific reasons why - each of which is a laudatory tale for anyone looking at 'growing' their business at their customers' expense and without taking their customers into consideration.

The Bait and Switch Rewards Program

When Staples first established its customer loyalty program (because that's what rewards programs are supposed to be), they gave customers a 5% discount on each purchase. Immediately. At the cash register or online.

The money stayed in your pocket.

Somewhere along the line, someone (undoubtedly in the Marketing Department) got the bright and (short-term) money-saving idea that they could switch their Staples Rewards program so that instead of money, customers could get points.

Points! What an excellent idea! Customers would, I'm sure they thought, be just as excited about earning points as they were about seeing an immediate discount. And they'd just love to go through a remittance process - printing out coupons or showing their smartphones - once they got 'enough' points to warrant a reward.

Especially if the rewards were time-sensitive and the points disappeared if there weren't enough during any given rewards period.

Now that's putting the customer first, right? Yeah, right.

Which takes us to today's coup de grace:

Scaring the S**t Out of Customers That Their Credit Card Data Has Been Stolen

This one was a new one on me - and one for which they should be particularly ashamed in these days of stolen credit card information and identity theft.

Last week I made a purchase for which I undoubtedly got some points (see above) and, as part of my Rewards program 'membership,' received an email receipt. (I got a printed copy at the time, too, but we won't talk about that now.) Usually, that email marks the end of the transaction.

Not this time.

This morning, after having not made another purchase, I got an email from them with the subject line:

Thank you for your purchase! Open for More Great Products.

Their marketers may have thought they were being wise and witty, thanking me again, but they were wrong. Because when I saw that subject line, my immediate thought was, 
"Oh, s**t! Someone hacked Staples and got my credit card information. S**t! S**t!! S**t!!! Don't those f****rs know what they're doing?!?"
And I promise you, I'm not the only one who reacted that way. After all, any one of us can go through the litany of companies - from Target to Home Depot to JPMorgan - that didn't protect their customers' information adequately.

Based on that subject line, all it looked like was they joined the group.

Clearly their marketers weren't thinking about timing and what their message actually said. Otherwise, they wouldn't have sent it.

For my part, it put quite a pall on my morning - and no vendor is worth that.

For your part, it's worth taking the time to look at how you're creating and, hopefully, supporting your customers' loyalty - reward programs or not - as well as how you're communicating with them. As you can clearly see from my example, you may get one pass, but you won't get two.

And with that, I'm saying bye-bye to Staples and taking my business elsewhere. The saddest part for Staples is that I'm not at all sorry.