Business and Politics: Avoiding Your Organization's Fiscal Cliffs

One of my areas of expertise is tracking how business and politics intersect in the ways they operate - and, most importantly, what we can learn from both. Over the years, I've written strategy papers on the subject as well as having advised senior members of United Kingdom political parties on how business strategy can be applied to create political party success.

With all that's been going on in US politics recently, I've decided to begin posting on the subject - only in this case, focusing on what business can learn from how politics operates, at its best and at its worst.

There are important strategic, operational and profit-related lessons to be learned and applied to your business, so, no matter where you live or what your political affiliation might be, put it aside and just look at the process.

I'll look forward to your thoughts and comments.
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On January 1st, 2013, a few minutes after 11 pm, the United States House of Representatives voted to accept the Senate's bill (approved some 21 hours earlier) averting the so-called "Fiscal Cliff."

As markets around the world opened for their first trading day of the new year, they upheld the conventional wisdom that a global economic catastrophe was averted. Markets and futures were immediately up and could well stay that way. At least until the already known next 'cliff' occurs in two to three months.

So, good for Congress. They did their job. They saved the world. For the moment.

They should also be ashamed of themselves.

The reason why they deserve real scorn is because it was this exact same Congress that agreed to the "cliff" in the first place. That was in December, 2010.

Twenty-five months ago.

Why did they create the cliff? The logic was that it would motivate the elected officials to work together to solve the debt and deficit problems the US is facing.

From then until now - while those twenty-five months passed with the cliff always looming - they weren't willing to do what needed to be done for their own country as well as those world markets and economies. Right up until the last minute - and only then because it was the last minute.

Okay, so that's the politics of it. What does this have to do with you?

Like it or not...admit it or not...but you have your version of a cliff playing out in your organization on a regular basis.

It's those things that you and your employees at every level see and know and recognize out on the horizon that you'll take care of later. Some day. Soon. You're sure of it.

Only those 'things' - both little and big - grow to outrageous proportions the closer they get to whatever time limit within which you're working.

Maybe it's when your customer needs an order filled. Or you've got a new product or service launch that needs that one more thing to make sure everything goes smoothly. Or there's an expert you know you're going to need to hire to make sure that the strategy you're currently working has a chance in hell of actually succeeding.

It's anything that escalates from knowledge to emergency - simply because you or someone in your organization let it get that far.

And it gets worse.

You may well have someone you trust who has made a success of their career swooping in at the last moment to save the day.

That's all well and good when the emergency is a true emergency - not a manufactured one. If it's the latter, then whoever is playing 'hero' is anything but. In fact that person - man or woman - is the equivalent of an organizational sociopath...allowing that particular cliff to loom and get ever closer for their own purposes, frankly, not caring how it might impact others.

Including you and your business.

Because if the 'thing' escalates far enough for long enough - at least to suit your local sociopath - even with a save, you'll lose your reputation as a trusted provider. There go the orders, customers and jobs. And there goes your business.

So, as this year begins, spend some time on your own and with your leadership team to:
  1. Take a look back over the past six to eighteen months
  2. Identify those situations that escalated into crises
  3. Determine how those crises occurred (real or manufactured)
  4. Define how long in advance the problems were known
  5. Determine in each case how long it took to get from knowledge to action
  6. Specify the outcomes in each case - including but not limited to impact on operating costs, revenues, profits, customer relations, market share, reputation, etc.
  7. Identify the specific functional areas and their respective managers/team members involved in each crisis
  8. Determine whether there is a trend of occurrences by any of the people or functions involved.
As well, if you have a Lean initiative going, take the time to review the teams' measures to identify any trends from the data that show highly risky levels of variation in your processes.

Once you have the information in hand - as uncomfortable as it might be - you'll know what to do. Do it. While you still have the time.

Because the biggest difference between business and politics is that the politicians who took the US to the edge of the fiscal cliff have at least two years before there is a remote possibility of being held responsible and accountable.

For business...for your business...you don't have that luxury. 

Figure out your cliffs now - and then manage your organization so that you're designed never to get close to them again.