Wanna Get Hired? Be an Entrepreneur!

Time was that if you had a great work record, were talented, highly regarded and accomplished, you'd get a job for big bucks.

Sorry, not any longer.

Now, at least in the tech space, if you want to get hired for big money, you need to have started up your own firm - and have it bought by one of the Big Boys.

Only what they're buying isn't what they used to buy.  Now they're buying you.

Because in the "time was" category - like a very few years ago - whether it was the companies or the VCs, they were looking for products.  New technologies.  New capabilities.

They're still looking for that - but they've gone to the core and are now looking at where those technologies come from.  And that's talented engineers.

To get that talent, they go direct.  They buy the company - then they dump the product.

There's even a hiring strategy named for it. It's called "acqhiring."

This raises some interesting questions for you - whether you're an entrepreneur or inside an organization and looking for talent.

For the entrepreneurs, the biggest difficulty will be seeing your product jettisoned.  Sure, you have lots of money - and stock options and the potential for more - but the question of how much you believe in your product really comes into play.

If you believe that strongly in your product and its potential, I suggest that you get yourself some seriously great legal support and have, as part of your employment agreement that if the company drops your technology within a specified timeframe, that that intellectual property reverts back to you.

That way, the Big Boy gets you for as long as you want or need to stay - but you still have the option of doing something with the baby you created.

For executives, you've got problems unless you've got seriously big bucks on hand that your company is willing to spend on acquisitions for products they don't want.  Just the people involved.

If you're a Facebook or a Google, it won't be a problem.  It's the way it's being played in the Valley.

If you're anything else, this won't sit comfortably, won't fit with your culture and has far more risks involved than in the technology space.

But it's definitely something to consider.

Because, no matter the industry or size of your organization, innovation is key - and innovation comes from people.  But it also comes from the systems inside your organization that lend themselves to people making those contributions - and someone being willing to listen.

Many of the engineers who were part of the acqhirings are not staying with the Big Boy buyer.  They're not happy there.  So they leave.

Probably to create new start-ups.

Who's leaving your organization?  Moreover, as the global economy improves, who are you worried might leave?

It's time to start looking at how you're using the skills you have - as well as buying what you need - to keep yourself ahead of the competitive curve.